Baking 101

Dust off your aprons,  get your rolling pins ready and up your baking game with some important baking terminology!


Bain-marie – A pan of hot water in which a cooking container is placed for slow cooking. Often used in baking to melt chocolate.

Beat – Rigorously mix ingredients together until thoroughly combined. This technique often contributes to the light and fluffiness of your bakes.

Blind Baking – Baking blind is the process of baking a pie crust or other pastry without the filling. Blind baking a pie crust is necessary when it will be filled with an unbaked filling, in which case the crust must be fully baked.

Caramelise – Heating sugar until it turns brown.

Cream – This technique is commonly use for softening butter and mixing with sugar.

Fold – Gently combine two mixtures together using a spoon without agitating the mixture.

Glaze – The use of a glossy liquid brushed over baked goods to create a shine.

Grease – To lubricate or oil something with a fat, usually butter.

Knead – Massage or squeeze dough with the hands.

Preheat – Turning the oven to a specific temperature before baking.

Reduce – Reducing the amount of liquid in a mixture by simmering or boiling to increase flavour.

Sift – To remove lumps and large particles from your bakes use a sieve to add powdered ingredients to your mixing bowl or to dust a thin layer of icing sugar over your finished bake.

Simmer – Bringing liquid to a temperature that is slightly below its boiling point and letting it gently bubble.

Stir – Use a spoon to mix the ingredients together.

Temper – To slowly raise the temperature of a substance gradually.

Whip – A technique that usually involves using a whisk to create a fluffy texture. Usually called for when mixing egg whites.

Yield – How many baked goods each recipe makes.

Zest – Scraping the skin of citrus fruits using a grater.

About the Author

Georgia

As an animal lover and baking enthusiast, Georgia can often be found experimenting with plant-based recipes in her kitchen.

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